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Hades symbol
Hades
Basic Information
Title(s) Agesander (Άγήσανδρος)
Agesilaos (Άγεσίλαος)
Symbol A black ram
Power level Greater Deity
Pantheon Olympian
Home Hades
Tartaros
Served By Charon
Erinyes
Thanatos
Minos
Influence
Dominion The Palace of the Underworld
Realm Hades
Portfolio Death, Underworld, Earth, wealth
Domains Death, Earth
Worshipers
Worshipers Necromancers, assassins, rogues
Worshiper alignments
LG NG CG
LN N CN
LE NE CE
Favored weapon Longsword
Rules Information
Alignment Lawful good (LN)
2nd Edition Statistics
Power Level Greater Power
Home Plane The Gray Waste of Hades
3rd Edition Statistics
Power Level Greater Deity
Home Plane Elysium
Realm Hades
Domains Death (Undead), Earth (Caves), Good (Archon), Law (Inevitable), Evil (Devil)

Source: Deities and Demigods , p. 115-117
Hades (/ˈhdz/; from Ancient Greek Ἅιδης/ᾍδης, Hāidēs; Doric Ἀΐδας Aidas) was the ancient Greek god of theunderworld. Eventually, the god's name came to designate the abode of the dead. In Greek mythology, Hades is the oldest male child of Cronus and Rhea considering the order of birth from the mother, or the youngest, considering the regurgitation by the father. The latter view is attested in Poseidon's speech in the Iliad.[1] According to myth, he and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon defeated the Titans and claimed rulership over the cosmos, ruling the underworld, air, and sea, respectively; the solid earth, long the province of Gaia, was available to all three concurrently.

Later the Greeks started referring to the god as Plouton (see below), which the Romans Latinized as Pluto.[2] The Romans would associate Hades/Pluto with their own chthonic gods, Dis Pater and Orcus. The corresponding Etruscangod was Aita. He is often pictured with the three-headed dog Cerberus. In the later mythological tradition, though not in antiquity, he is associated with the Helm of Darkness and the bident. The term hades in Christian theology (and in New Testament Greek) is parallel to Hebrew sheol (שאול, "grave, dirt-pit"), and refers to the abode of the dead. The Christian concept of hell is more akin to and communicated by the Greek concept of Tartarus, a deep, gloomy part of hades used as a dungeon of torment and suffering.

God of the UnderworldEdit

Hades other side

From HercXena Wiki.

Appearance
Edit

Hades typically dresses in black, almost like someone who's gone emo.  Sometimes, however, he will appear in white clothes, but usually when he is visiting the Elysian Fields.  His appearance does not endear him to his sister, Demeter.  And he was forced to kidnap his lover, Persephone, after trying to win Demeter's favor and failing every time.

PersonalityEdit

Hades is typically dour, but can be an ally to the PCs.

DescriptionEdit

In Greek mythology, Hades the god of the underworld, was a son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. He had three sisters, Demeter, Hestia, and Hera, as well as two brothers, Zeus, the youngest of the three, and Poseidon, collectively comprising the original six Olympian gods. Upon reaching adulthood, Zeus managed to force his father to disgorge his siblings. After their release the six younger gods, along with allies they managed to gather, challenged the elder gods for power in the Titanomachy, a divine war. The war lasted for ten years and ended with the victory of the younger gods. Following their victory, according to a single famous passage in the Iliad (xv.187–93), Hades and his two brothers, Poseidon and Zeus, drew lots[16] for realms to rule. Zeus got the sky, Poseidon got the seas, and Hades received the underworld,[17] the unseen realm to which the souls of the dead go upon leaving the world as well as any and all things beneath the earth.

Hades obtained his wife and queen, Persephone, through trickery and violent abduction. The myth, particularly as represented in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, connected the Eleusinian Mysteries with the Olympian pantheon. Helios told the grieving Demeter that Hades was not unworthy as a consort for Persephone:

Aidoneus, the Ruler of Many, is no unfitting husband among the deathless gods for your child, being your own brother and born of the same stock: also, for honor, he has that third share which he received when division was made at the first, and is appointed lord of those among whom he dwells.
— Homeric Hymn to Demeter
Hades p116

Picture of Hades

Despite modern connotations of death as evil, Hades was actually more altruistically inclined in mythology. Hades was often portrayed as passive rather than evil; his role was often maintaining relative balance.

Hades ruled the dead, assisted by others over whom he had complete authority. He strictly forbade his subjects to leave his domain and would become quite enraged when anyone tried to leave, or if someone tried to steal the souls from his realm. His wrath was equally terrible for anyone who tried to cheat death or otherwise crossed him, as Sisyphus and Pirithous found out to their sorrow.

Besides Heracles, the only other living people who ventured to the Underworld were all heroes: Odysseus, Aeneas (accompanied by the Sibyl), Orpheus, Theseus with Pirithous, and, in a late romance, Psyche. None of them were pleased with what they witnessed in the realm of the dead. In particular, the Greek war hero Achilles, whom Odysseus conjured with a blood libation, said:

O shining Odysseus, never try to console me for dying.

I would rather follow the plow as thrall to another
man, one with no land allotted to him and not much to live on,
than be a king over all the perished dead.

  — Achilles' soul to Odysseus. Homer, Odyssey' 11.488-491
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